APOLLO 11 50th ANNIVERSARY ROBBINS COMMEMORATIVE ANTIQUE COPPER MEDALLION - The Space Store
APOLLO 11 50th ANNIVERSARY ROBBINS COMMEMORATIVE ANTIQUE COPPER MEDALLION - The Space Store
APOLLO 11 50th ANNIVERSARY ROBBINS COMMEMORATIVE ANTIQUE COPPER MEDALLION - The Space Store

APOLLO 11 50th ANNIVERSARY ROBBINS COMMEMORATIVE ANTIQUE COPPER MEDALLION

Regular price $29.95

NEW RELEASE, AUGUST 2018

APOLLO 11 50th ANNIVERSARY ROBBINS COMMEMORATIVE ANTIQUE COPPER  MEDALLION 
THE SPACE STORE INCLUDES A MEDALLION STAND - NO ONE ELSE IS INCLUDING ONE. 

Made from Original Dies

Struck from the original dies in cooperation with the Armstrong, Collins and Aldrin families. We partnered with the families and Sunshine Mint to use the original dies to make new dies to create all medals being released in our program.

Robbins Medals have been produced for, and flown on, every manned U.S. mission since Apollo 7.

Between 255 and 450 Robbins medallions were minted for each Apollo mission. The medallions for the first few flights were struck with blank space on the reverse for the launch and return dates to be added post-flight. For the moon landing missions three blank fields were included for the launch, lunar landing, and return dates.

The fact that the Robbins medallions are flown, closely associated with the astronauts, and available to collectors in very restricted quantities makes them very sought-after collectibles.

All 450 Apollo 11 Robbins medallions were intended for flight but Collins has reported that 10 went missing from the KSC crew quarters pre-flight and thus were not flown. Some of these medallions have since resurfaced and can be identified by the fact that the mission dates are not engraved in the reverse.

The primary objective of Apollo 11 was to complete a national goal set by President John F. Kennedy on May 25, 1961: perform a crewed lunar landing and return to Earth.

Apollo 11 launched from Cape Kennedy on July 16, 1969, carrying Commander Neil Armstrong, Command Module Pilot Michael Collins and Lunar Module Pilot Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin into an initial Earth-orbit of 114 by 116 miles. An estimated 530 million people watched Armstrong's televised image and heard his voice describe the event as he took "...one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind" on July 20, 1969.

Upon landing, Armstrong and Aldrin spent 21 hours, 36 minutes on the moon's surface.